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By Kara Brandeisky, ProPublica 

Edward Snowden Photo: The Guardian/Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras

Edward Snowden
Photo: The Guardian/Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras

Ten months after Edward Snowden’s first disclosures, three main legislative proposals have emerged for surveillance reform: one from President Obama, one from the House Intelligence Committee, and one proposal favored by civil libertarians.

All the plans purport to end the bulk phone records collection program, but there are big differences – and a lot they don’t do. Here’s a rundown.

By Rebecca LaFlure, Center for Public Integrity 

Headquarters for U.S. Investigations Services Inc., or USIS, in Falls Church, Virginia. Photo:  Sarah Whitmire/Center for Public Integrity

Headquarters for U.S. Investigations Services Inc., or USIS, in Falls Church, Virginia. Photo: Sarah Whitmire/Center for Public Integrity

Efforts by the government to fix a notable problem sometimes create a new mess that turns out to be as insidious and troublesome as the first, or even worse.

This is what happened when Washington attempted to improve the way its security agencies vetted hundreds of thousands of workers needed suddenly after the 9/11 attacks to pursue counterterror tasks and oversee heightened secrecy requirements.